Help and Support for Hearing Loss

and other ear conditions such as tinnitus, Meniere’s disease and hyperacusis. Information on causes of hearing loss. Assistive devices for hearing impaired people.

Sudden Hearing Loss Treatment Duluth MN

Local resource for sudden hearing loss treatment in Duluth. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to hearing aids, hearing loss implants, audiologists, ENT doctors and hearing specialists, as well as advice and content on hearing loss resources and treatments.

Hearing Associates
(866) 960-7361
4905 Matterhorn Dr
Duluth, MN
Services
Diagnostic Testing, Tinnitus Evaluation and Treatment, Dispensing of Digital Hearing Aids, Hearing Aid Checks and Servicing, Assistive Listening Devices (ALDs)
Hours
SundayClosed ,Monday08:30 AM - 06:00 PM ,Tuesday08:30 AM - 06:30 PM ,Wednesday08:30 AM - 04:30 PM ,Thursday08:30 AM - 06:30 PM ,Friday08:30 AM - 04:30 PM ,SaturdayClosed
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Minnesota Hearing Aid Prof.
(763) 515-2291
500 Osborne Rd Ne Ste 315
Minneapolis, MN
Hours
SundayClosed ,Monday07:30 AM - 04:30 PM ,Tuesday07:30 AM - 04:30 PM ,Wednesday07:30 AM - 04:30 PM ,Thursday07:30 AM - 04:30 PM ,Friday07:30 AM - 12:00 PM ,SaturdayClosed
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Fairview Fridley Clinic
(763) 515-1255
6341 University Ave Ne
Minneapolis, MN
Services
Welcome to Fairview Home Care and Hospice We bring the caring home News & EventsFantastic ResultsCongratulations to Fairview Home Care for completing the Minnesota Department of Health survey with no deficiencies, reflecting staff excellence and dedication to quality patient care.Prestigious awardKathy Lucas, Fairview Home Care and Hospice president, won Minnesota Hospital Association''s Bruce and Denise Rueben Courage Award for courage exhibited on behalf of patients and their families. I Am Fa
Hours
SundayClosed
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Minnesota Hearing Aid Prof.
(763) 515-2292
3960 Coon Rapids Blvd Nw 201 Mercy Health Care Center
Minneapolis, MN
Hours
SundayClosed ,Monday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,Tuesday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,Wednesday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,Thursday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,Friday09:30 AM - 05:00 PM ,SaturdayClosed
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Mayo Hearing
(888) 903-2295
200 1st St SW
Rochester, MN
Services
Multilingual registration and finance staff are dedicated to meeting your needs.ArizonaFloridaMinnesotaRepresentative OfficesCanadaUAE – DubaiMexicoGuatemala
Hours
SundayClosed ,MondayOpen by Appointment ,TuesdayOpen by Appointment ,WednesdayOpen by Appointment ,ThursdayOpen by Appointment ,FridayOpen by Appointment ,SaturdayClosed
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The Hearing Clinic Of St Cloud
(320) 281-4571
1528 Northway Dr
Saint Cloud, MN
Services
Ear ServicesThere can be many different ear-related problems which range from the simple earwax buildup to the more complex tumors. Our board certified ear, nose & throat specialists can diagnose and develop an appropriate treatment plan for you. Possible ear problems and treatments.The nose and sinuses are complex structures which have many functions. Problems with these can greatly affect quality of life and may become a serious concern. Our physicians are experienced with problems and tre
Hours
SundayClosed ,MondayOpen by Appointment ,TuesdayOpen by Appointment ,WednesdayOpen by Appointment ,ThursdayOpen by Appointment ,FridayOpen by Appointment ,SaturdayClosed
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Hearing Solutions
(952) 232-5498
1581 Highway Seven
Hopkins, MN
Services
# State-of-the-art Hearing Testing / Diagnostic Evaluations# Video Inspection of Ear Drums – Wax Removal# Tinnitus Evaluation (head noises or ringing or buzzing) Tinnitus Retraining Therapy, Noise Generators# Authorized Factory Repair of Most Hearing Aids# (EFS) Environmental Sound Simulator to realistically fit and adjust hearing aids in simulated noisy and group situations.# Authorized Factory Repair of Most Name Brand Hearing Aids# 45-Day Adjustment and Adaptation Period# Hearing Aid Le
Hours
SundayOpen by Appointment ,Monday10:00 AM - 06:00 PM ,Tuesday10:00 AM - 06:00 PM ,Wednesday10:00 AM - 06:00 PM ,Thursday10:00 AM - 06:00 PM ,Friday10:00 AM - 06:00 PM ,SaturdayOpen by Appointment
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Park Nicollet Health Services
(952) 232-5423
3800 Park Nicollet Blvd
Minneapolis, MN
Hours
SundayClosed
Payment
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Hearing Associates
(218) 212-1897
303 SE 1st St
Grand Rapids, MN
Services
Kid''s Corner Diagnostics Self Assessment Communication Tips Protecting Your Hearing
Hours
Sunday09:00 AM - 08:00 PM ,Monday08:00 AM - 10:00 PM ,Tuesday08:00 AM - 10:00 PM ,Wednesday08:00 AM - 10:00 PM ,Thursday08:00 AM - 10:00 PM ,Friday08:00 AM - 10:00 PM ,Saturday08:00 AM - 10:00 PM
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Fairmont Medical Center
(507) 399-0041
800 Medical Center Dr
Fairmont, MN
Services
Services & Specialties at Fairmont Medical CenterFairmont Medical Center''s physicians and allied health staff provide a full range of family care and many specialty and subspecialty healthcare services for patients in the Fairmont, Minnesota, and Armstrong, Iowa, area. To learn more about our services and specialties, select an option from the list below:AcupunctureAllergyAnesthesiologyAudiologyBalance ClinicBirthPlaceCardiac RehabilitationCardiologyDEXA ScanDiabetes EducationDietitian Services
Hours
SundayClosed ,MondayOpen by Appointment ,TuesdayOpen by Appointment ,WednesdayOpen by Appointment ,ThursdayOpen by Appointment ,FridayOpen by Appointment ,SaturdayClosed
Payment
Credit Cards,Visa,MasterCard,American Express,Discover,Diners Club,Cash,Check,Debit,Insurance

Sudden Hearing Loss

by Neil Bauman, Ph.D.

A man explained:

I am a 37 year old male who has experienced sudden hearing loss in my right ear. Unfortunately, the problem was not treated right away. Prednisone therapy, which didn’t help, was initiated 13 days after the loss. In hearing tests I could not understand any speech, though I hear tones and some low register sounds. I’m curious to know the possibility, if any, of the hearing returning. My MRI came out negative and I experienced very little, if any, vertigo. It has now been four weeks since the loss. If my hearing does not recover, does the ringing, at least, eventually die down? Do hearing aids assist in reducing the ringing?

Sudden hearing loss typically strikes without warning. The standard treatment is Prednisone. Beginning it as soon as possible after the sudden hearing loss gives the best chances of recovery. Just remember that sometimes Prednisone works and sometimes it doesn’t. Also, sometimes hearing comes back on its own without, or in spite of, any treatment.

In your case, it seems the Prednisone didn’t work. Even though you began it after 13 days, that is not necessarily too late—but the sooner you begin, typically the better results you have.

Unfortunately, it seems that neither the Prednisone, nor time, has restored your hearing. Typically, the worse the sudden loss, the less chance there is of full, or even any, recovery.

The way it usually works is that the hearing you have at the end of 30 days or so is what you will be left with—unless your hearing has been returning a bit at a time all along, in which case it could continue to improve after the 30 days. Since you haven’t had any significant hearing returning during this time, I think the chances that more will return are slim.

You ask, “If my hearing does not recover, does the ringing, at least, eventually die down?”

It may, or may not. In any case, you can learn to habituate to your tinnitus so it no longer bothers you—no matter how loud or soft it is. The thing to do is not dwell on, or focus on, your tinnitus. Totally ignore it, and act like it isn’t there. When you do this, you will notice that your tinnitus tends to fade into the background and not be so intrusive. Not easy to do, I know, but it does work for many people. I’ve had tinnitus for 40 plus years now, and although my ears are ringing away as I write this, I do not let my tinnitus bother me. It is just “there”. (Of course, if I had by “druthers”, I’d rather it wasn’t there at all!)

Conversely, if you dwell on your tinnitus, it will get even worse. That is w...

Click here to read more from The Center for Hearing Loss Help

Sudden Hearing Loss (SHL, SSHL)

Question: My mother suddenly lost her hearing. She never had any known ear illnesses before. What could cause this?—S. M.

Answer: Good question! Few things are so baffling (and scary) as waking up one day and finding your hearing is gone. Immediately you want to know what caused it, and more to the point, can anything be done to bring your hearing back.

Ear specialists tell us that sudden sensorineural (inner ear) hearing loss is one of the most perplexing and controversial unsolved mysteries about our ears. Since even they can't agree among themselves what causes it, nor how to treat it, no wonder you are baffled. Here's the latest on this subject.

There are two basic kinds of hearing loss. If the hearing loss occurs in the middle ear, we call it a conductive loss. If it occurs in the inner ear, auditory nerve or brain, we call it a sensorineural hearing loss. (The old term was "nerve deafness.")

Sudden Conductive Hearing Losses

Sudden conductive hearing losses are relatively easy to diagnose and fix. The most common example would be the ubiquitous head cold. It may result in fluid build up/infection in your middle ears. Because the little bones in your middle ears can't move freely in the fluid like they do in air, you don't hear as well. You likely also feel pressure in your ears or your ears feel "plugged up." This condition normally affects both ears at the same time. Fortunately, when this fluid drains out your Eustachian tubes (which may take up to several weeks), your hearing returns to normal. This kind of hearing loss is quite common, especially in younger children, but is not normally a serious problem and is certainly not a medical emergency.

More serious could be a blow to your head, or a sudden loud sound like an explosion that could dislocate/break the tiny bones in your middle ear. You need to go to your ear specialist at once. Your ear specialist can often repair this damage through surgery and your hearing returns to normal or near normal again.

Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (SSHL).

Sudden sensorineural hearing losses (SSHL) are medical emergencies. You need to see your ear specialist (preferably an otologist or neurotologist) immediately (not your family doctor—he is not qualified and it wastes precious time you don't have).

By definition, you have SSHL if you have a hearing loss that occurs within three days (often within minutes or an hour or two) and your hearing loss is greater than 30 dB over three adjacent octaves (test frequencies) as shown on your audiogram.

About one-third of the people with SSHL discover their hearing loss when they wake up in the morning. They go to bed with normal hearing, and in the morning they realize they are deaf in one or both ears! Fortunately, SSHL only affects both ears about 2-4% of the time. Other people discover the...

Click here to read more from The Center for Hearing Loss Help

Sudden Hearing Loss And Strokes

by Neil Bauman, Ph.D.

The Washington Post (June 26, 2008) ran a piece entitled “Sudden Hearing Loss May Portend Stroke” The first three paragraphs read:

Sudden hearing loss may foreshadow a stroke by as much as two years,” say Taiwanese researchers.

The researchers analyzed five years of follow-up data on 1,423 patients hospitalized for an acute episode of sudden hearing loss and found they were more than 1.5 times more likely to suffer a stroke than a control group of 5,692 patients hospitalized for an appendectomy.

The findings, published in the current issue of Stroke, haven’t been duplicated in other research and should be interpreted with caution.

The article then goes on to muddy the waters and reaches no clear conclusions.

What the researchers don’t seem to realize is that this can make sense. if a person has a build-up of “gunk” in their arteries (to use a fancy medical term), and if that gunk should travel to one of the arteries in (or leading to) the inner ear and block blood flow there, the result is sudden and drastic hearing loss.

If the same gunk had traveled to the brain and blocked an artery there, the result would have been a stroke. Same condition—just a different location.

Now, since the arteries in the inner ear are among the smallest in the body, it doesn’t take much to block them. Thus such episodes of sudden hearing loss truly may indicate an underlying problem that, if not fixed, may lead to strokes and heart attacks if bigger pieces of gunk lodge in the brain or heart respectively. Thus it behooves us to heed warnings such as sudden hearing loss of vascular origin.

Having said that, there are lots of causes of sudden hearing loss that have nothing at all to do with vascular issue..

Click here to read more from The Center for Hearing Loss Help

Sudden Hearing Loss–Medical Emergency or Just a Cold?

by Neil Bauman, Ph.D.

You have a cold and now you notice you can’t hear well out of one or both ears. It/they feel plugged up and you can’t hear well. Now comes the million dollar question. Is this hearing loss just because you have a cold (resulting in fluid in your middle ear) and will resolve itself in a week or two as your cold goes away? Or is this sudden hearing loss caused by a virus attacking your inner ear–in which case this is a medical emergency and needs to be treated now?

For years, most primary care physicians have assumed that it was the former case and told their patients to come back in a couple of weeks if their hearing had not returned. As a result, those people that actually had a viral attack wasted their precious golden hours when treatment could be successful and now are tragically left with a permanent hearing loss.

Fortunately for us, Dr. Jeffery Harris, chief of otolaryngology/head and neck surgery at the University of California, San Diego Medical Center has recently come up with a quick test to separate the two conditions.

Here is all you need to do, assuming that only one ear is “blocked.” Hum out loud. If you hear your voice louder in the blocked ear, the problem is congestion (fluid in the middle ear) and is probably temporary until your cold goes away and your ear clears.

However, if you hear your voice louder in your good ear, this probably indicates a viral attack causing permanent hearing loss if left untreated. If this is your case, seek treatment immediately. This is a true medical emergency and needs to be treated now if you want a chance of getting your hearing back. According to Dr. Harris, your chances of getting your hearing back with immediate treatment are greater than 50%.

If both ears are blocked equally, this little test isn’t going to work (unless you can remember how loud humming sounded before you got the cold–and then apply the above rules). Thus, it is better to err on the side of caution if you have reduced hearing in both ears and seek competent medical help now.

Read my articles “ Sudden Hearing Loss Is a Medical Emergency ” and “ Finding the Right Doctor for Sudden Hearing Loss and Other Ear Problems .” These articles will help you make informed decisions on what you should do next...

Click here to read more from The Center for Hearing Loss Help