Help and Support for Hearing Loss

and other ear conditions such as tinnitus, Meniere’s disease and hyperacusis. Information on causes of hearing loss. Assistive devices for hearing impaired people.

Reverse Slope Loss Treatment East Amherst NY

Local resource for reverse slope loss treatment in East Amherst. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to hearing aids and devices, audiologists, ear nose and throat doctors and hearing specialists, as well as advice and content on hearing loss treatment and resources.

Hearing Evaluation Services
(716) 568-7108
2733 Wehrle Dr
Buffalo, NY
Services
diometricHearing EvaluationTympanometryAcoustic Reflex TestingOtoacoustic EmissionsCentral Auditory Processing EvaluationsSpecial TestsAuditory Brainstem ResponseVideonystogmographyVestibular Evoked Myogenic PotentialTreatment and Hearing AidsCounselingHearing AidsAssistive Listening DevicesCerumen RemovalEarmoldsSwim moldsNoise protection earmoldsMusician’s earmoldsIndustrialIndustrial TestingHearing Conservation Program
Hours
SundayClosed ,MondayClosed ,Tuesday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,Wednesday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,Thursday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,Friday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,SaturdayClosed
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Hearing Evaluation Services of Buffalo
(716) 462-5087
4600 Main St Ste 201
Buffalo, NY
Services
The appointment for a comprehensive hearing evaluation begins with a complete hearing health history. The audiologist will then examine your ear canals to ensure they are clear of debris. Using either traditional headphones or insert earphones, the audiologist will perform testing to determine your level or threshold of hearing over a wide frequency range. A bone vibrator will then be placed behind your ear to help determine if any loss of hearing is due to a problem with the outer or middle ear
Hours
SundayClosed ,Monday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,Tuesday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,Wednesday09:00 PM - 05:00 PM ,Thursday09:00 PM - 05:00 PM ,Friday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,SaturdayClosed
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Hearing & Speech Ctr Of WNY
(716) 239-4858
2545 Sheridan Dr
Tonawanda, NY
Services
Our Speech-Language Pathologists provide speech-language evaluations, therapy and counseling for a variety of speech-language. Therapy programs are designed to meet the individual needs of both children and adults. The clinical sessions include family involvement through direct observation, conferences and counseling.Once the communication difficulties are assessed and identified; our Speech Language Pathologists develop and implement a therapy plan that is individually tailored to meet the spec
Hours
SundayClosed
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Diversified Services
(716) 239-4795
2900 Delaware Ave
Buffalo, NY
Hours
SundayClosed
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Buffalo Hearing And Speech Ctr
(716) 608-4881
1026 Union Rd
West Seneca, NY
Services
Audiological TestingBuffalo Hearing & Speech Center offers the newest, most technologically advanced hearing aids available. Major brands are available in a variety of styles and sound quality. In-the-ear, behind-the-ear, canal, completely-in-the-canal, and open fit technology are available in all levels of digital sound.What does the hearing aid package include?Highest quality care by a licensed AudiologistHearing aid evaluationHearing aid and hearing aid fittingOrientation and training2-week a
Hours
Monday08:00 AM - 06:00 PM ,Tuesday08:00 AM - 06:00 PM ,Wednesday08:00 AM - 06:00 PM ,Thursday08:00 AM - 06:00 PM ,Friday08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
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Buffalo Hearing And
(716) 568-4253
5225 SHERIDAN DR
Buffalo, NY
Services
Buffalo Hearing & Speech Center offers the newest, most technologically advanced hearing aids available. Major brands are available in a variety of styles and sound quality. In-the-ear, behind-the-ear, canal, completely-in-the-canal, and open fit technology are available in all levels of digital sound.What does the hearing aid package include? * Highest quality care by a licensed Audiologist * Hearing aid evaluation * Hearing aid and hearing aid fitting * Orientation and training
Hours
SundayClosed ,Monday08:30 AM - 05:00 PM ,Tuesday08:30 AM - 05:00 PM ,Wednesday08:30 AM - 05:00 PM ,Thursday08:30 AM - 05:00 PM ,Friday08:30 AM - 04:30 PM ,SaturdayClosed
Payment
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Amherst Audiological Services
(716) 239-4770
315 Alberta Dr Ste 105
Buffalo, NY
Services
ENG Test - ElectronystagmogramThe ENG test is probably one of the most useful tests to diagnose dizzy complaints in which other obvious causes such as ear infection, head injury or certain medication side effects are not involved.The ENG is a series of tests designed to evaluate the inner-ear''s vestibular mechanism. This test electronically determines the responses of the balance mechanisms of the vestibular system. These responses are expressed through eye movements which are recorded by elect
Hours
SundayClosed
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University At Buffalo Speech-
(716) 462-6592
52 Biomedical Education Bldg
Buffalo, NY
Services
United Business Media Limited is a leading global business media company. We focus on two principal business activities:the distribution, targeting and monitoring of news and information from the world’s top companies, organisations and agencies – UBM’s business in this market is PR Newswire;serving professional and commercial communities, from doctors to game developers, from journalists to jewellery dealers, from farmers to pharmacists around the world with media products tha
Hours
SundayClosed ,Monday08:30 AM - 04:30 PM ,Tuesday08:30 AM - 04:30 PM ,Wednesday08:30 AM - 04:30 PM ,Thursday08:30 AM - 04:30 PM ,Friday09:00 AM - 03:00 PM ,SaturdayClosed
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Buffalo Hearing And
(716) 239-4784
50 E North St Attn: Tracey Reynolds
Buffalo, NY
Services
Early Childhood ProgramAbout ECPThe Early Childhood Program provides evaluations and treatment for children with special needs, from birth to age five. If you have questions or concerns regarding your child''s speech, language or motor development, please feel free to contact our Early Childhood Program. We will gladly provide you with information that will aide you in determining if your child needs help and educate you on the appropriate steps to take to receive services. Please call us at (71
Hours
SundayClosed
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Lake Shore Audiology
(716) 608-3741
290 Center Rd
West Seneca, NY
Services
Services Diagnostic Hearing EvaluationsThe audiometric evaluation consists of pure tone air and bone conduction testing. Testing pure tones is done to determine the degree of hearing loss and whether hearing loss is conductive or sensorineural. Speech audiometry is obtained to evaluate the individual’s ability to understand speech at an elevated comfortable volume. Speech discrimination is also tested to determine how much a person will understand when wearing hearing aids.Battery SalesCom
Hours
SundayClosed
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Kinds of Hearing Losses

Question: Karen asked: What is a reverse-slope loss? I have something called a cookie bite loss. I have no idea what it is, but that is what my audiologist called it.

Answer: These terms refer to the shape your hearing loss makes on your audiogram. Each of these shapes have been given strange colloquial names such as ski-slope loss, cookie-bite loss, flat loss, reverse cookie-bite loss and reverse-slope (reverse curve) loss. Here is a quick run down on them.

Normal Hearing

Before you can appreciate what the various hearing losses look like on an audiogram, you first need to know what normal hearing looks like. "Perfect" hearing theoretically would be a straight line at the 0 dB level (Fig. 1). In actual fact, audiologists typically consider “normal” hearing to range anywhere from -10 dB (negative numbers lie above the 0 dB line) to 25 dB. Fig. 2 shows an example of “normal” hearing.

Flat Loss

A hearing loss that is approximately the same at all frequencies is more or less a straight horizontal line and is called appropriately enough a “flat loss.” or a “flat curve” (which is a bit of an oxymoron). This kind of loss is more common in people with conductive losses. Fig. 3 gives an example of a flat loss.

Ski-Slope Loss

Ski-slope losses are by far the most common kind of hearing losses. These losses get their name from the “ski-slope” shape of the hearing loss on the audiogram. With ski-slope hearing losses, there is little or no hearing loss in the low frequencies but considerable loss in the higher frequencies. Often the mid frequency range is severe to profound. The audiogram looks much like a ski slope—the top of the hill is on the left and the slope drops to the right. There is an almost infinite variety of ski-slope curves—some slope down gently (Fig. 4), while others are much steeper. In extreme cases the curve is almost flat in the low frequencies and then, as Fig. 5 illustrates, just about drops straight down (really more like a ski-jump loss)!

Reverse-Slope Loss

A reverse-slope loss is the reverse of the ski-slope loss (hence its name). In reverse-slope losses, the curve is low at the low frequencies and slopes up to the right. Thus, the ski-hill is on the right and drops to the left. A person with a reverse-slope loss hears better in the high frequencies than in the low frequencies. This is a very rare kind of hearing loss. Fig 6. depicts a mild reverse-slope loss, Fig. 7 illustrates an severe reverse-slope loss and Fig. 8 shows an extreme reverse slope loss such as I have. Notice that the high frequency hearing extends to and incredible -30 dB. Also note that this audiogram shows the hearing curve up to 20,000 Hz, whereas the other audiograms all stop at 8,000 Hz, the highest frequency audiologists normally test.

Cookie-Bite Loss

A cookie-bite loss looks like someone took a bite out of the t...

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Reverse Slope Hearing Loss

Answers to Your Questions about Hearing Loss Issues  

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January 12, 2006: 7:51 am: Dr. Neil Hearing Loss

Reverse Slope Hearing Loss

by Neil Bauman, Ph.D.

A concerned mother wrote:

Our son failed the newborn hearing test, and failed two repeat ABR tests. He has reverse slope hearing loss in both ears ranging from about 30 dB at 4000 Hz to 70 dB at 500 Hz. Our audiologist stated that reverse slope hearing loss is rare, and that he could have progressive hearing loss? Could you please explain a this to me? I read that you have reverse slope hearing loss as well.

Your audiologist is right. Reverse slope hearing losses (where you hear better in the higher frequencies than in the lower frequencies) are rare–particularly the extreme kind of reverse slope loss that I have. You son has a range of 40 dB between his best hearing frequency and his worst. My wife has a reverse slope loss, but her range is only about 20 dB. In extreme cases such as mine, this range is in the neighborhood of 100 dB.

Just as with the common high frequency hearing loss (typically called a “ski slope loss,” the impact of a 20 dB range versus a 100 dB range is very different.

My concern is that your son was tested in the lower frequencies, probably only up to 8,000 Hz. With a reverse slope loss, you really want to know how good his hearing is in the very high frequencies. Some reverse slope losses can result in incredible hearing in the very high frequencies. For example, my hearing didn’t cross the 0 dB threshold until 10,000 Hz and topped out at about -30 dB close to 20,000 Hz. This is incredible hearing! (-30 dB is 30 dB above the 0 dB line. 0 dB is considered the softest sound a perfect normal human ear can hear. This means that my hearing in the very high frequencies was far more acute than people with perfect hearing.)

In practical terms, having this extreme reverse slope hearing loss meant that I could hear people whispering from across a big school classroom because of my incredible high-frequency hearing, yet couldn’t hear the teacher talking just 4 feet in front of my face because my worst loss whas right at 1,000 Hz where a lot of speech occurs.

As far as reverse slope losses being progressive, I don’t think they are any more progressive than many other kinds of losses, but yes, reverse slope losses can indeed be progressive. For example, reverse slope hearing losses run in my family. For those affected family members, our hearing dropped rapidly from birth to about 5 years of age. After that, our hearing remains constant until we lose hearing from old age or from other causes.

In my family, reverse slope hearing loss is a dominant genetic condition. As such, each child has a 50% of being born with this loss. As a result, more or less half of us in each generation have this hearing loss. Also, reverse slope losses tend to be non-syndromic. This just means that there ar...

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The Bizarre World of Extreme Reverse-Slope Hearing Losses

Imagine a person with a hearing loss so severe he can’t hear thunder rumbling overhead, yet, at the same time, has hearing so acute he can hear a pin drop; or imagine a person that can’t hear you talking just 4 feet away, yet clearly hears a whisper from across a large room; or imagine a person that can’t hear a car motor running right beside him, yet can hear a single dry leaf skittering along in the gutter 50 feet away.

“Impossible,” you say, “a person could never have such good and bad hearing at the same time!”

Surprise! It’s true. Welcome to my world—the bizarre world of people with extreme reverse-slope hearing losses.

What Is a Reverse-Slope (or Low Frequency) Hearing Loss?

Hearing losses are sometimes classified according to the shape they form on an audiogram. They commonly go by strange names such as ski-slope loss, cookie-bite loss, flat loss, reverse cookie-bite loss and reverse-slope (or reverse curve) hearing loss. (My article Kinds of Hearing Losses explains these different hearing losses and illustrates the various shapes they form on audiograms.)

By far the most common kind of hearing loss is the typical ski-slope loss where the line on the audiogram slopes down to the right. In contrast, a reverse-slope loss (as its name implies) does the reverse and slopes up to the right.

As a result this kind of hearing loss is sometimes referred to as an up-sloping loss, a rising loss, or even a low fr...

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What Is A Reverse-Slope Hearing Loss?

by Neil Bauman, Ph.D.

A lady asked:

What is a reverse-slope hearing loss? I have never heard of this terminology for hearing loss, Would you please enlighten me?

Sure thing. Hearing losses go by some strange names such as cookie-bite loss, ski-slope loss, reverse-slope loss, etc. These names come from the shape of the hearing loss when it is plotted on an audiogram.

The most common is the ski-slope hearing loss. The ski-slope loss is where you have reasonably good hearing in the low frequencies (shown on the left side of the audiogram), but you don’t hear much at all in the high frequencies (shown on the right side of the audiogram). The audiogram thus looks much like a ski hill sloping down to the right.

A reverse slope loss, as its name implies, is just the opposite. Hearing loss is mostly in the low frequencies, with little or no loss in the high frequencies. Thus a reverse-slope loss slopes up to the right. Reverse-slope losses–especially the extreme version I have, are very rare.

If you want to learn more about the strange names associated with the various kinds of hearing losses, and see the shapes they form on audiograms, read my short, illustrated article “ Kinds of Hearing Losses .”

If you want to learn more about the rare reverse-slope hearing loss and just how weird hearing is with this kind of loss, read my articles (long or abridged) entitled “ The Bizarre World of Extreme Reverse-Slope Hearing Loss that is now posted to the HearingLossHelp website...

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