Help and Support for Hearing Loss

and other ear conditions such as tinnitus, Meniere’s disease and hyperacusis. Information on causes of hearing loss. Assistive devices for hearing impaired people.

Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Treatment Dover NH

Local resource for noise-induced hearing loss treatment in Dover. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to hearing aids, ENT doctors, audiologists, hearing tests and hearing specialists, as well as advice and content on hearing loss treatments and resources.

Sound Advice Hearing Centers
(888) 453-6516
165 Rochester Hill Rd Unit #3
Rochester, NH
Services
Sound Advice Hearing Centers, Inc. has five easy locations in Plymouth, New London, Keene, Exeter and Rochester.Our Services include:ASSESSMENT * Objective hearing testing to determine the nature and degree of your hearing loss * Subjective assessment of your needs and significant other''s perceptions to establish and prioritize desired communication outcomes.REFERRAL * If warranted, appropriate referral to a physician for more in-depth diagnostic work or medical interventionEDUCATION/C
Hours
SundayClosed ,Monday08:30 AM - 04:30 PM by Appointment ,Tuesday08:30 AM - 04:30 PM by Appointment ,Wednesday08:30 AM - 04:30 PM by Appointment ,Thursday08:30 AM - 04:30 PM by Appointment ,Friday08:30 AM - 04:30 PM by Appointment ,SaturdayClosed
Payment
Credit Cards,Visa,MasterCard,American Express,Cash,Check,Insurance

Seacoast Hearing Center
(603) 379-6031
599 Lafayette Road Unit 2
Portsmouth, NH
Services
* Audiometric Evaluations: Adults Comprehensive hearing evaluation including speech, air and bone conduction testing * Hearing Aid checks Complete cleaning, retubing and listening check of the instrument. May also include replacement of battery door, trimmer cover and wax spring. * Hearing Aid evaluations Consultation and discussion of patient’s options based on brief personal history and audiometric results. Demo of hearing instrument also available. * Hearing Aid:
Hours
SundayClosed ,Monday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,Tuesday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,Wednesday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,Thursday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,Friday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,SaturdayClosed
Payment
Credit Cards,Cash,Check,Insurance

Peggy L. Sheets
(888) 435-0817
87 S Willow St
Manchester, NH
Services
Your experience with our practice will include:Diagnosis and treatment by audiologists with over 50 years combined experience diagnosing hearing loss and dispensing hearing aidsOur audiologists will analyze all of your diagnostic testing, reports and recommend treatment. They will also fit you with the hearing aids, if hearing aids are appropriate for your condition.
Hours
SundayClosed
Payment
Credit Cards,Cash,Check,Insurance

Hearing Solutions New England
(603) 769-3372
3 Allds St
Nashua, NH
Services
Your experience with our practice will include:Diagnosis and treatment by audiologists with over 50 years combined experience diagnosing hearing loss and dispensing hearing aidsOur audiologists will analyze all of your diagnostic testing, reports and recommend treatment. They will also fit you with the hearing aids, if hearing aids are appropriate for your condition.
Hours
SundayClosed
Payment
Credit Cards,Cash,Check,Insurance

SNHMC
(603) 505-8189
10 Prospect St Ste 401
Nashua, NH
Hours
SundayClosed
Payment
Credit Cards,Cash,Check,Insurance

Family Ear, Nose & Throat
(888) 331-9492
518 US Route 1 Suite A-8
Kittery, ME
Services
* Diagnostic audiological evaluations from a nationally certified, state licensed audiologist* Ear, nose & throat physician consultation and earwax removal* hearing aid evaluations and demonstrations* hearing aid dispensing* battery and hearing aid accessory sales * hearing loss and hearing aid education* medical, surgical and rehabilitative options for hearing loss treatment
Hours
SundayClosed ,Monday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,Tuesday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,Wednesday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,Thursday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,Friday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,SaturdayClosed
Payment
Credit Cards,Visa,MasterCard,Cash,Check,Insurance

Sound Advice Hearing Ctrs Inc
(603) 583-4773
21 Hampton Rd Ste 103
Exeter, NH
Services
ASSESSMENTObjective hearing testing to determine the nature and degree of your hearing lossSubjective assessment of your needs and significant other''s perceptions to establish and prioritize desired communication outcomes.REFERRALIf warranted, appropriate referral to a physician for more in-depth diagnostic work or medical interventionEDUCATION/CONSULTATIONDiscussion of your results and how the degree of loss and its configuration likely impacts your communication in various listening situation
Hours
SundayClosed
Payment
Credit Cards,Cash,Check,Insurance

E N T Specialists Of Southern
(888) 433-0513
30 Canton St
Manchester, NH
Services
The field of OTOLARYNGOLOGY is one of the broadest in the medical profession. As Board Certified Otolaryngologists, our doctors have completed five years of specialized training. They are surgeons as well as physicians, and are experts in the most modern treatment methods.
Hours
MondayOpen by Appointment ,Tuesday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM by Appointment ,Wednesday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM by Appointment ,Thursday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM by Appointment ,Friday08:00 AM - 03:30 PM by Appointment
Payment
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Crotched Mountain Rehab Center
(603) 547-9700
1 Verney Dr
Greenfield, NH
Services
Crotched Mountain has earned a reputation for excellence through serving the needs of people with disabilities and their families for more than 50 years. Our rehabilitation center is located on the southern slope of Crotched Mountain in Greenfield, NH surrounded by a 1,400-acre woodland preserve. We invite you to learn more about the people, programs and resources that make Crotched Mountain a destination for people with disabilities and their families.-------------------------------------------
Hours
SundayClosed
Payment
Credit Cards,Cash,Check,Insurance

Sound Advice Hearing Centers
(603) 346-4401
101 Boulder Point Dr Ste 2
Plymouth, NH
Services
ASSESSMENT Objective hearing testing to determine the nature and degree of your hearing loss Subjective assessment of your needs and significant other''s perceptions to establish and prioritize desired communication outcomes. REFERRAL If warranted, appropriate referral to a physician for more in-depth diagnostic work or medical intervention EDUCATION/CONSULTATION Discussion of your results and how the degree of loss and its configuration likely impacts your communication in various listening sit
Hours
SundayClosed
Payment
Credit Cards,Cash,Check,Insurance

Loud Noise and Hard of Hearing People

by Neil Bauman, Ph.D.

A hard of hearing person asked:

Is the noise damage threshold the same for me as it is for a person with normal hearing? Do I just add my decibel loss (by frequency) to the noise damage threshold for normal ears? [approximately 80 to 85 dB] If sustained noise at 90 dB is bad for a person with normal hearing, does my noise damage threshold start at 150 dB because I have a 60 dB hearing loss?

Excellent question. I used to wonder about this too. It sounds so plausible on the surface–hard of hearing people can stand far more noise than hearing people because of their underlying hearing loss.

Although this is generally true for people with conductive hearing losses, it certainly is not true for the vast majority of us since we have sensorineural hearing losses.

Here is why. Think about this logically. The mechanism of damage is the same whether we have normal hearing or are hard of hearing. Excessively loud sounds damage our ears by destroying both the minute hairs (cilia) on the hair cells, and the underlying hair cells themselves too. When this happens, that hair cell no longer sends a signal to our brains. As a result we end up with a hearing loss at the frequency of sound that hair cell was sensitive to.

At first, if we have normal hearing, the few destroyed hair cells would not produce noticeable hearing loss. But when enough hair cells are destroyed, the message being sent to our brains is riddled with “gaps” which we notice as hearing loss. The actual damage to our inner ears is the same whether we have near normal hearing or have a profound hearing loss.

However, if we have a severe or profound loss, we may not seem to lose much more hearing from being exposed to loud sounds. This is not because we have a higher tolerance for loud sounds, but because there are not many hair cells left to be destroyed! (I’ve seen pictures where whole banks of hair cells are completely missing. This is quite striking when compared to pictures with all the hair cells present.)

Therefore, in answer to your question, “No, you cannot add the amount of your hearing loss to the noise damage threshold to find the amount of noise you can stand without further damaging your hearing.” For example, it is absolutely wrong for me to think that since I have an 80 dB loss, I can stand noise at 90 dB plus the 80 dB I am missing for a total of 170 dB before I do any further damage to my ears. This loud a sound will definitely instantly destroy more of my remaining hearing.

Not only that, in actual fact, I will be writhing in pain long before I hear a sound that loud. Why? Most of us with severe or worse hearing losses usually have severe recruitment as well. As a result, our tolerance for loud ...

Click here to read more from The Center for Hearing Loss Help

Noise-Induced Hearing Loss and Our Children

by Neil Bauman, Ph.D.

If you had to guess, what percentage of children between the ages of 6 and 19 years of age would you think have noise-induced hearing loss? (Note: this is not hearing loss from causes such as middle ear infections, heredity, etc., but just noise-induced hearing loss.)

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention the answer is 12.5%. This means that approximately 5,200,000 kids in the USA have permanent noise-induced hearing loss (1). It’s shocking to realize that on the average, 1 in every 8 children you meet each day has a significant hearing loss just from listening to sounds that are too loud.

There are two areas of concern.

First, it’s about time parents take an active interest in what their kids are listening to and at what volume. Safe sound levels are a maximum of 80 dB if they are going to listen for any length of time.

Second, teachers need to be aware that at the very minimum 1 out of every 8 of their students have trouble hearing them. Yet I hear so many teachers say they don’t know of any students in their classrooms that have hearing losses.

Now you know. They are there--3 or 4 in the average classroom-- in every classroom in the nation. Add to these, the many other children, especially in the lower grades, with hearing loss from ear infections, allergies, etc. One study showed that on any given day, 15% of the children in elementary schools have a significant hearing loss. ...

Click here to read more from The Center for Hearing Loss Help