Help and Support for Hearing Loss

and other ear conditions such as tinnitus, Meniere’s disease and hyperacusis. Information on causes of hearing loss. Assistive devices for hearing impaired people.

Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Treatment Boone NC

Local resource for noise-induced hearing loss treatment in Boone. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to hearing aids, ENT doctors, audiologists, hearing tests and hearing specialists, as well as advice and content on hearing loss treatments and resources.

Appalachian State University
(828) 355-4246
Speech And Hearing Center University Hall
Boone, NC
Hours
SundayClosed
Payment
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Audio Of The Sandhills
(910) 684-5571
1902 N Sandhills Blvd Ste K
Aberdeen, NC
Hours
SundayClosed
Payment
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WNC Hearing Aid Svcs
(828) 484-4301
63 Monticello Rd
Weaverville, NC
Services
Hearing Testing for determination of hearing aid eligibility Occupational Hearing Testing Counseling involving Hearing Aid amplification Referral Source to Otolarghinologists Sales and Service of most major brands of hearing aids Minor repairs done in office Cleaning & Adjustments Assistive listening devices Batteries & other consumables Speciality Hearing Devices Availibility in all of Western North Carolina
Hours
SundayClosed ,MondayOpen by Appointment ,TuesdayOpen by Appointment ,WednesdayOpen by Appointment ,ThursdayOpen by Appointment ,FridayOpen by Appointment ,SaturdayClosed
Payment
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Carolina Audiology
(828) 358-0416
256C 10th Ave NE
Hickory, NC
Services
Hearing Aid Consultations, State-of-the-Art Digital Hearing Aids in a range of sizes and prices, Affordable Hearing Aid Repairs, Hearing Aid Batteries and Accessories, Custom Ear Molds including: Swim molds Hearing protection Musician earplugs, Assistive Listening Devices, Patient Educational Classes
Hours
SundayClosed ,MondayClosed ,TuesdayClosed ,WednesdayClosed ,ThursdayClosed ,FridayClosed ,SaturdayClosed
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Coastal Hearing Centers
(910) 816-4213
302 Liberty St
Whiteville, NC
Hours
SundayClosed
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Charlotte ENT Associates
(704) 246-3231
10352 Park Rd
Charlotte, NC
Hours
SundayClosed
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Carolina Audiology
(704) 445-7660
751 S Laurel St
Lincolnton, NC
Services
We provide a broad range of medical services, and care routinely for:Carolina Ear, Nose & Throat Head and Neck Surgery Center, P.A * Pediatric ear, nose, and throat disease * Voice and reflux disorders * Ear disease and hearing disorders * Sinus and nasal disease * Snoring and sleep apnea * Thyroid disorders * Head and neck cancer Carolina Audiology Clinic * Functional and neurologic hearing disorders * Vestibular/Balance disorders * Hearing AidsCarolina Sinus and A
Hours
SundayClosed ,Monday08:00 AM - 05:30 PM ,Tuesday08:00 AM - 05:30 PM ,Wednesday08:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,Thursday08:00 AM - 05:30 PM ,Friday08:00 AM - 05:00 PM ,SaturdayClosed
Payment
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Hearing Healthcare Ctrs of NC
(704) 461-1041
635 Cox Rd Ste C
Gastonia, NC
Hours
SundayClosed ,Monday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM by Appointment ,Tuesday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM by Appointment ,Wednesday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM by Appointment ,Thursday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM by Appointment ,Friday09:00 AM - 12:00 PM by Appointment ,SaturdayClosed
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1st Choice Hearing Care
(252) 558-1494
1702 E Arlington Blvd Ste F
Greenville, NC
Services
17 years experience in the field. Provider of Audiology services, Hearing testing, hearing instrument selection and fitting, industrial screenings, testing and reporting. Multiple manufacturer''s represented and a Lyric provider- extended wear hearing device
Hours
SundayClosed ,Monday08:30 AM - 04:00 PM ,Tuesday08:30 AM - 04:30 PM ,Wednesday08:30 AM - 04:00 PM ,Thursday08:30 AM - 04:00 PM ,Friday08:30 AM - 02:00 PM ,SaturdayClosed
Payment
Credit Cards,Visa,MasterCard,American Express,Discover,Cash,Check,Debit,Insurance

Hearing Healthcare Ctrs of NC
(704) 908-0514
5110 Park Rd Ste 1C
Charlotte, NC
Hours
SundayClosed ,MondayOpen by Appointment ,TuesdayOpen by Appointment ,WednesdayOpen by Appointment ,ThursdayOpen by Appointment ,FridayOpen by Appointment ,SaturdayClosed
Payment
Credit Cards,Cash,Check,Insurance

Loud Noise and Hard of Hearing People

by Neil Bauman, Ph.D.

A hard of hearing person asked:

Is the noise damage threshold the same for me as it is for a person with normal hearing? Do I just add my decibel loss (by frequency) to the noise damage threshold for normal ears? [approximately 80 to 85 dB] If sustained noise at 90 dB is bad for a person with normal hearing, does my noise damage threshold start at 150 dB because I have a 60 dB hearing loss?

Excellent question. I used to wonder about this too. It sounds so plausible on the surface–hard of hearing people can stand far more noise than hearing people because of their underlying hearing loss.

Although this is generally true for people with conductive hearing losses, it certainly is not true for the vast majority of us since we have sensorineural hearing losses.

Here is why. Think about this logically. The mechanism of damage is the same whether we have normal hearing or are hard of hearing. Excessively loud sounds damage our ears by destroying both the minute hairs (cilia) on the hair cells, and the underlying hair cells themselves too. When this happens, that hair cell no longer sends a signal to our brains. As a result we end up with a hearing loss at the frequency of sound that hair cell was sensitive to.

At first, if we have normal hearing, the few destroyed hair cells would not produce noticeable hearing loss. But when enough hair cells are destroyed, the message being sent to our brains is riddled with “gaps” which we notice as hearing loss. The actual damage to our inner ears is the same whether we have near normal hearing or have a profound hearing loss.

However, if we have a severe or profound loss, we may not seem to lose much more hearing from being exposed to loud sounds. This is not because we have a higher tolerance for loud sounds, but because there are not many hair cells left to be destroyed! (I’ve seen pictures where whole banks of hair cells are completely missing. This is quite striking when compared to pictures with all the hair cells present.)

Therefore, in answer to your question, “No, you cannot add the amount of your hearing loss to the noise damage threshold to find the amount of noise you can stand without further damaging your hearing.” For example, it is absolutely wrong for me to think that since I have an 80 dB loss, I can stand noise at 90 dB plus the 80 dB I am missing for a total of 170 dB before I do any further damage to my ears. This loud a sound will definitely instantly destroy more of my remaining hearing.

Not only that, in actual fact, I will be writhing in pain long before I hear a sound that loud. Why? Most of us with severe or worse hearing losses usually have severe recruitment as well. As a result, our tolerance for loud ...

Click here to read more from The Center for Hearing Loss Help

Noise-Induced Hearing Loss and Our Children

by Neil Bauman, Ph.D.

If you had to guess, what percentage of children between the ages of 6 and 19 years of age would you think have noise-induced hearing loss? (Note: this is not hearing loss from causes such as middle ear infections, heredity, etc., but just noise-induced hearing loss.)

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention the answer is 12.5%. This means that approximately 5,200,000 kids in the USA have permanent noise-induced hearing loss (1). It’s shocking to realize that on the average, 1 in every 8 children you meet each day has a significant hearing loss just from listening to sounds that are too loud.

There are two areas of concern.

First, it’s about time parents take an active interest in what their kids are listening to and at what volume. Safe sound levels are a maximum of 80 dB if they are going to listen for any length of time.

Second, teachers need to be aware that at the very minimum 1 out of every 8 of their students have trouble hearing them. Yet I hear so many teachers say they don’t know of any students in their classrooms that have hearing losses.

Now you know. They are there--3 or 4 in the average classroom-- in every classroom in the nation. Add to these, the many other children, especially in the lower grades, with hearing loss from ear infections, allergies, etc. One study showed that on any given day, 15% of the children in elementary schools have a significant hearing loss. ...

Click here to read more from The Center for Hearing Loss Help